Sequestering Agents, Heater & Pump | ehottubsandpools

Protect your hot tub from stains and scale

 

Top heater is scaled over and does not work. Bottom heater is what the top heater should look like.

Whether you’re purchasing a new hot tub or have owned one for many years, I’m going to offer some advice on stain and scale prevention that will save you money in the long run.

The first step while filling your hot tub is to add a sequestering agent. This chemical is marketed under many brand names but its main purpose is stain and scale control. A sequestering agent works by keeping the minerals that cause stains and scale soluble in the water. This means that they can’t settle on surfaces and damage them. Scale that is allowed to form on plastic and rubber surfaces will break down these materials. This means that the life of your hot tubs jets will be shortened. The locking mechanism that holds the jet in place will eventually break down and release its hold in the tub. The only way to fix that problem after it has occurred is to buy a new jet. With hot tubs today having as many as one hundred jets at a cost of $15.00 to $30.00 each, this is a problem you’ll want to avoid.

Another piece of hot tub equipment that can be damaged by not controlling scale is your tubs heater. Formation of scale on a hot tubs heating element can cause the element to lose continuity and stop heating. The fix for a scaled over heater is replacement. Most hot tub heaters range in price from $70.00 for an element up to over $500.00 for a complete heater, plus installation costs. If your tub is still under warranty, it won’t matter. Manufacturers will not warranty a scaled up heater. Scale falls under chemical damage.

Finally, the most expensive piece of hot tub equipment that can be damaged by scale is the pump. Every pump in your hot tub has a wet end and a dry end. Between these two ends is a seal. The seal is made of plastic, rubber, ceramic, and a metal spring. Scale will break down the plastic and rubber on that seal and allow water to travel down the pump shaft from the wet end to the dry end. The expensive end. The motor. When water reaches the inside of that electric motor, it’s usually over. The moving parts will corrode very quickly. The pump will get progressively louder and eventually seize. In addition to checking your pumps monthly to make sure there are no leaks, using a sequestering agent is the best way to insure long lives for your pumps. Most hot tubs have 2 to 5 pumps in them with a cost ranging from $350.00 to $750.00 each plus installation, so make sure to protect them. All hot tubs need a sequestering agent used in them. The quality of water used to fill and top off your tub will determine how much of an initial treatment you need and how much to add weekly. Over the years I have had some hot tub owners tell me they don’t see a difference when they use a sequestering agent in their tub, so they think they don’t need to use it. I always explain it the same way. Its preventative maintenance. You can drive your car for years and never change the oil in it and not see a problem right up to the point where the engine blows up. Using a sequestering agent prevents you from having problems in your tub. At an average cost of around $10.00 a month it just seems worth it to protect some of the most expensive components of your hot tub.

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1 Comment

  1. My spa has a gritty sandpaper feel to the inside surface. I have not been using a sequestering agent, I am going to now, but what can I do to remove this grit? Thanks for any help.

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